Oct 292016
 

Here we have again a mix of three lenses, the 12-40/2.8 at the top,

the fish for the image showing how the stairs leading to the cloister are situated in relation to the refectory (a cool application of this lens, if you ask me),

and finally the 7-14/2.8 for the B&W shot looking down. I like the image looking up best, therefore the order is a little bit weird 🙂

I can’t remember why I went B&W with the last shot, but I suppose this is a case of “tried it randomly and it worked”.

Oct 282016
 

Empty halls of pure architecture. That’s what those old French monasteries are.

The first two images have been taken with rectilinear lenses. I’ve used the 7-14/2.8 for the big hall of the church. Could easily be mistaken for Dwarvish architecture in Moria, below the Misty Mountains, right?

The third image has been taken with the 7.5/f3.5 fish. It’s a manual lens without electronic communication between lens and body, but I am absolutely sure I have used it wide open.

It’s the first time I have used a fisheye on vacations. You won’t see it in use very often, but during the months since, I have found it to be a valuable addition to my “Big Gear”.

Oct 272016
 

When you go to Provence, and when you love architecture and medieval art, and when you like monasteries and churches, in other words, when you are a lot like me, you have to visit the three big Cistercian monasteries. Silvacane is the first of them, located NNW of Aix-en-Provence.

Silvacane is not in use as a monastery any more. Its style is strictly Romanesque, colors and decorations are long gone.

This is not how those buildings have looked while they were in use. Medieval churches were painted in colors and richly decorated. Many of them still are, especially those that have not been used as horse stables or barracks, like it was the fate of so many of those buildings around and after the French Revolution.