May 152017
 

Vtraba Garden is built into the steep side of a hill. Terraces are connected by stairs, and the whole ensemble is a microcosm of baroque taste.

There are few baroque gardens that I like. Most of them favor size and control of nature over actual beauty. Think of Versailles or Vienna’s Schönbrunn. This one’s the exception.

When you enter the garden, it is extremely steep and it looks very small. It’s a work of Art though. Each view is carefully designed, everything is controlled, but in a very playful way. When being in Prague, this is truely a place that must not be missed.

May 112017
 

Standing in such a big church with a long, well stabilized lens, you have almost endless possibilities.

The golden patron saint is a detail from the main altar, the other image is from somewhere on the ceiling. I could have gone on and on, but somewhere you have to stop. One more post and then we’re out of the church 😀

May 092017
 

Yeah, I know, don’t tell me: I’m milking Saint Nicholas. At least this will be the last wide-angle image of the church 🙂

But then: isn’t it beautiful? It took quite some preprocessing, I’ve played a little bit with the colors, but basically that’s what it feels like to stand up there and looking across this gorgeous hall.

May 082017
 

Today’s the 8th of May, for some among my fellow citizen still a controversial date. It’s the day Nazi Germany surrendered in 1945.

Almost every city has a street named after the date, but for many it was always seen as a Day of Defeat rather than the day Austria got back its freedom. Every year we still see functionaries of the so-called Freedom Party (FPÖ) gather that day to “remember the victims”, which is a mostly a euphemism for remembering the “Good Old Days”.

May 072017
 

Rectilinear lenses are so much easier to use than fisheyes. They exaggerate the corners, while the view through a fisheye comresses everything near the edges. This makes it much harder to compose precisely. A good viewfinder helps (and the E-M1’s is very good), but when viewing a fisheye image on the monitor, you’re almost guaranteed to find flaws.